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Implementation



This is pre-use testing

The implementation stage would make sure that the final product performs as it is designed to do and within specifications.
For example, does the boiler perform to specification?

This would apply to any product, even a report for example.
In use testing is obvious for items such as a boiler system as there would also be safety factors to take into account.

However, for items such as reports the following could be considered.

  • Have the aims of the report been met?
  • Is the format correct?
  • Has it been checked for factual and grammatical accuracy?
  • Is the circulation list up to date? etc

Performance control procedures

There should be agreed performance control procedures in place to test the product.
These would have been agreed with the customer at the start of the project but may well have undergone modifications as the project progresses.
For example, improved technological changes may lead to better testing methods.

May need to take action

Failure of the final product during implementation would result in a decision point.
This could produce various actions:

  • Modify design so the deficiencies are overcome

It may become clear that the original design for the final product was at fault and it will need modification in some fashion.
This could be both a long and expensive task. Any changes at this stage would be reported to the Project Board together with the ramifications in terms of cost and time.

  • Correct any missed design faults

It is possible that the product has not met its original specifications in some way.
It is unlikely that this should occur if good control methods are in place.
If it does happen, the result will be similar to the first case and may involve considerable time and money.
The Project Board would be informed as above.

  • Accept the modified performance of the final product

The Project Board and the customer would be informed.
It is possible that the customer may accept the lower performance.
This may arise if the product had been produced to the correct specifications but the final product performance is then shown to be unrealistic.

The customer may only accept the lower performance with adequate compensation.

  • Stop and close the project

The worst case scenario is that the Project Board consider all options either impractical or too expensive to proceed further.
In this case, the Project Board may decide to cut their losses.

Any corrective actions should be recorded for the Project Review.

Under PRINCE2® [see ‘The Complete Project Management plus PRINCE2’] this would be covered as part of the process Closing a Project (CP).

PRINCE2® is a Registered Trade Mark of the Office of Government Commerce in the United Kingdom and other countries.

Non - PRINCE2 information